Look what I found

A scrapbook of my Internet Travels

No Surprise Here That a Pay-To-Play-or-Vote Awards Is Not Good

thecomedybureau:

Here’s just another unfortunate case of the name of our fair Los Angeles being co-opted into something designed, whether intentional or not, to support the stereotype that LA is a hollow den of wolves and sharks waiting to taking advantage of you. It’s unfortunate that it happens, but it happens wherever there’s a wealth of both talent and people wanting desperately to succeed.

Just keep in mind that the awards that mean anything in comedy are ones you weren’t trying to win and just were being undeniably funny, not the ones set up where people have to pay to vote.

American Aquarium Drinker: After Sandy

robdelaney:

If you were following coverage of Sandy last night, you may have seen photos of nurses and firemen transporting babies from the NICU (Neonatal Intensive Care Unit) at NYU’s hospital. If you didn’t, you might consider looking them up. They’re very moving. They show courageous…

howtosharpenpencils:

We made a TV commercial for HOW TO SHARPEN PENCILS! It features Mary Norris (copy editor at the New Yorker, long-time pencil enthusiast) and the voice of Kurt Braunohler, one of the funniest, sweetest guys in comedyland. It also features a brief shot of my favorite photograph ever.

It will air on late-night TV in early November. You and your friends will see it during re-runs of: Saturday Night Live (VH1), The Soup (E! Entertainment Television), Conan (TBS), The Daily Show, Colbert Report, Futurama, South Park (Comedy Central), and Adult Swim (Cartoon Network).

Please share far and wide! I want to sell more copies of my pencil book! I want to be interviewed on Charlie Rose! I WANT IT ALL

danmeth:

If I ran Hollywood…From the people who brought you this. 

danmeth:

If I ran Hollywood…
From the people who brought you this. 

acehotel:

The Agua Caliente band of indigenous Americans spans Cahuilla and other native communities living in the Coachella Valley and the San Jacinto and Santa Rosa Mountains. The tribes have formed the Agua Caliente Cultural Museum in response to the endangerment of their cultural, spiritual and linguistic survival in the face of rapid change, and they use the space to embrace new technologies and resources to support the celebration and preservation of the lifeblood of their cultures. If you’re in the are visiting Ace, or you live near Palm Springs or in the low desert, go check out their new Interpretive Garden of Native Plants. Native plants used for food, medicinal purposes and building materials are identified in the garden by their Cahuilla, common and botanical names. You can catch the ribbon cutting ceremony in Palm Springs this Wednesday, December 7 from 6 to 8pm. See more about the museum, the Cahuilla people and the event on their website.



Photos are of Teodora Cuero, a revered Kumiai plant specialist and traditional authority in her village La Huerta in Baja, seen here gathering some of the valley’s native plants for healing, food and other purposes. The bottom photo is the Opuntia ficus_indica, aka prickly pear tuna, which grows wild all over the San Diego back country and is a delicious snack, photographed by Deborah Small.

acehotel:

The Agua Caliente band of indigenous Americans spans Cahuilla and other native communities living in the Coachella Valley and the San Jacinto and Santa Rosa Mountains. The tribes have formed the Agua Caliente Cultural Museum in response to the endangerment of their cultural, spiritual and linguistic survival in the face of rapid change, and they use the space to embrace new technologies and resources to support the celebration and preservation of the lifeblood of their cultures. If you’re in the are visiting Ace, or you live near Palm Springs or in the low desert, go check out their new Interpretive Garden of Native Plants. Native plants used for food, medicinal purposes and building materials are identified in the garden by their Cahuilla, common and botanical names. You can catch the ribbon cutting ceremony in Palm Springs this Wednesday, December 7 from 6 to 8pm. See more about the museum, the Cahuilla people and the event on their website.



Photos are of Teodora Cuero, a revered Kumiai plant specialist and traditional authority in her village La Huerta in Baja, seen here gathering some of the valley’s native plants for healing, food and other purposes. The bottom photo is the Opuntia ficus_indica, aka prickly pear tuna, which grows wild all over the San Diego back country and is a delicious snack, photographed by Deborah Small.